Posts Tagged ‘freelance photojournalist’

ollanta humala

Sunday I had my last opportunity to photograph presidential candidate Ollanta Humala before Sunday’s election. As the two candidates debated at the Marriott Hotel in Miraflores, supporters of both rallied on the streets outside the venue. The final poll had Humala and his opponent Keiko Fujimori in a tie.

ollanta humala peru presidential election

ollanta humala peru presidential election

ollanta humala peru presidential election


keiko fujimori

Sunday I had my last opportunity to photograph presidential candidate Keiko Fujimori before Sunday’s election. As the two candidates debated at the Marriott Hotel in Miraflores, supporters of both rallied on the streets outside the venue. The final poll had Fujimori and her opponent Ollanta Humala in a tie.

In the first image Fujimori is seen with her husband, a good ol’ Jersey boy from the US of A. Read a recent article about him in Time. If Fujimori is elected, he will become the first American “first gentleman” in the world.

keiko fujimori peru presidential election

keiko fujimori peru presidential election

keiko fujimori peru presidential election


chinese peruvian food = chifa

World renowned Peruvian chef Gastón Acurio opened Madam Tusan in April. It offers a variety of food known in Peru as “chifa” – Chinese Peruvian food. The word Tusan referes to the children of Chinese immigrants in Perú. I shot this video for Living in Peru. Check out the full story written by Jorge Riveros-Cayo (it’s in English!).


belén

Belén. A city of 50,000 within another city. A city of immigrants from smaller Amazonian communities. A city that knows two seasons, rainy and dry. In one season its inhabitants walk on worn paths of dirt. In the other they walk across planks of wood, over water. Many of the houses are twice the size during the dry season. Water fills the first story of the homes so life continues on the second floor until the water receeds. Other homes float, anchored to pieces of wood. The water becomes a road for boats and floating restaurants and markets to pass. Women wash clothes and dishes in the water as children take turns jumping in for an afternoon cool down. The outhouse several feet away ends up in the woman’s sink, the children’s pool. A man from Belén smiles and says, “We are the Venice of Perú.”

belen iquitos peru

belen iquitos peru

belen iquitos peru


janeth

I met Janeth back in January. She’s one of many women whose life has been changed by an NGO named Pro Mujer. An initial loan of $150 got Janeth started in the chocolate business. She makes truffles and chocolate lollipops as well as handmade gift boxes. Best part? She doesn’t like chocolate. I guess there’s a bright side to that. If I tried to make it as a chocolatier there wouldn’t be much product left to sell…!

Click here if you’d like to make a donation to Pro Mujer.


nanay river

This photo makes me think of two wonderful things: going for a dip in the delicious water and taking the canoe out for a sunset ride.

rio nanay san pedro peru


13

It was the day she became a teenager. 13. “What are the birthday plans?” I asked. “Will there be a party?” No plata for a party, they answered. I thought, with money what would they even buy in their town? In San Pedro they have no electricity, sewer system or road. I suppose you can find a few warm Cokes, snacks and fruit. The closest cake? At least a 30-minute boat ride away.

Rosa came from even farther to do the girls’ hair. She wrapped their hair tight around plastic pieces and covered it in a milky pink liquid that transported the smell of a high-end salon to the Peruvian Amazon. After an hour of waiting, the girls’ straight hair would turn to curls. I wondered if it would also change their frowns to smiles.

san pedro birthday peruvian amazon


amazonian blackwater

Last weekend I finally made it to the Amazon! We went to tell the story of the first release of the endangered Amazonian Manatee back into its natural habitat (will post more from that story soon). Here are a few pictures I made on the way to and from Cocha El Dorado, deep in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve. While the Amazon River is more of a cappucino color from the sand and sediment high in the Andes, its tributaries are mostly blackwater rivers, colored from vegetation decay. Oh beautiful blackwater. My camera loves you.

cocha el dorado pacaya-samiria national reserveCocha El Dorado

cocha el dorado pacaya-samiria national reserveCocha El Dorado

cocha el dorado pacaya-samiria national reserveYanayacu River


election coverage thoughts

These two photos remind me of two thoughts (of many) I had during my short time covering the Peruvian presidential elections.

1) The media here seem to get what they want. They surround the candidates in such a frenzy it feels like a mosh pit…each journalist absolutely relentless. (Somehow Luis Castañeda managed to keep his smile!) Sometimes I joined in, throwing elbows. Other times I stayed back and literally laughed at what I was seeing in front of me. At the National Federation of Shoe Shiners, where Alejandro Toledo appeared, the media seemed in control of the event. The members of the federation there to see Toledo weren’t pleased by this fact, standing on their chairs and shouting “Prensa amarilla!” – “Yellow journalists!”.

2) The constituency seemed surprised when I wanted to make its picture. I noticed a group of women in the front row waiting in excitement for Toledo to arrive. They had brought him a t-shirt from their chapter – San Juan de Miraflores. After snapping a moment of their gidiness and getting their names, we engaged in good conversation about the election and Toledo. I was greeted by the same sense of pride and flattery each time I made photographs of the constituency.

I had the opportunity to write a general election story the week before the elections for InfoSur Hoy. Go back in time and check it out.

alejandro toledo peru

lucho castaneda peru


ollanta

Though the rest of the candidates were known by their last names, he was known by his first. A few more outtakes from the weeks before the election. I believe the man in these photos, Ollanta Humala, will be the next president of Perú.

ollanta humala peru

ollanta humala peru

ollanta humala